Tag Archives: Diet

Keeping Up With The Kardashians Diet, Fitness Trends


Thanks to their spellbinding show, relentless social media presence, and popular apps, the Kardashians — particularly the three oldest sisters — have overshared to a point where it feels like we know them on an intimate level, according to Christina Beck, PhD, a communication professor at Ohio University and author of Celebrity Health Narratives and the Public Health. So, although we may sense that their advice is misguided or uninformed (for example, suggesting an unnecessary vaginal skincare routine), we trust them because we feel like we know and understand their story, Dr. Beck says. The Kardashians are unlikely role models, and that’s why it works: They swear incessantly, talk frankly about their genitals, have tumultuous love lives, and put it all on display for fans.



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Many celebrity diet crazes are bogus


Weird and dubious celebrity diets are practically as old as Hollywood itself, but next time your favourite Kardashian or Instagram fitness model touts the latest detox or cleansing diet trend, remember that they also have a team of nutritionists and Photoshop at their disposal. 

We spoke with professional nutritionist Dr. Caroline Apovian and dietitian, Brittany Markides, to dissect and debunk the science behind some of the most popular celebrity diets out there. From detox skinny teas to the “Master Cleanse” lemonade diet, promoted by Beyoncé herself, see which health trends are bogus. 

Gwyneth Paltrow touts her juice cleanses on GOOP.​

Similarly to tea detoxes, juice cleanses do not clean out your system of “toxins,” and can actually be dangerous.

“If you are on a detox or cleanse, you consume very few calories every day,” Markides told INSIDER. “Much of the weight lost during the cleanse is due to fluid losses. When normal fluid/energy intake is resumed, the water weight is quickly regained. Detox protocols can cause dehydration, electrolyte imbalances, and impaired bowel function.” 

Mariah Carey swears by a “purple diet” for losing baby weight.​

This one is a bit tricky. Purple vegetables like eggplants and radishes are healthy, but correlation does not equal causation in this instance.

“Purple-hued produce is high in anthocyanins, which likely has a myriad of health benefits,” Markides said. “But there are hundreds of compounds in produce of all hues that may have health benefits: lutein in tomatoes and watermelon that may reduce risk of prostate cancer and improve eye health, flavonols in kale and broccoli, etc. Eat purple veggies and fruit, by all means, but don’t do it to the exclusion of other types of produce.”

Shailene Woodley eats clay as part of her “detox” lifestyle​

Eating clay regularly sounds pretty crazy to begin with, and, as it turns out, it has zero basis in nutritional science.

“The basic premise of this diet is that through ingesting clay, the body will be purified of toxins,” Dr. Apovian said.  “The trouble with this claim is primarily that clay can be harmful and contain high amounts of arsenic and lead, and should not be eaten.”

Miranda Kerr is all about “clean eating”​

Clean eating sounds great in theory: ban all processed foods from your life and only eat whole fruits, vegetables, grains and lean meats. But there’s a catch, and it’s harming your health.

“When new clients eat clean, they are elevating certain types of food (organic, locally-sourced) as ‘good,’ while demonizing all other food as ‘bad,’” Markides said. “This way of thinking hurts our food relationship and leads to distorted eating patterns… Because the thought that the foods they are craving are ‘bad’ is deeply ingrained, eating these foods, which are perfectly fine, causes guilt and shame.”

Kate Hudson follows the Alkaline diet and says “no” to acidic food​

An alkaline diet is supposed to balance your body’s pH level. However, it’s not scientifically proven, and deprivation of “acidic” foods could be causing more harm than good. “This diet consists of plant-based fruits, veggies, beans, and nuts — all components of a healthy diet,” Dr. Apovian said. “However, this diet also limits ‘acidic’ foods like dairy and meat.  Limiting animal-based foods can lead to a lack of variety in the diet. […] An alkaline diet would end up restricting B12, and could lead to anaemia, fatigue, mood disturbances, and accelerated brain ageing.”

The Independent 



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Alia Bhatt reveals her diet secrets with celebrity dietician Rujuta Diwekar


By: Lifestyle Desk | New Delhi |
Updated: June 30, 2017 9:54 pm


alia bhatt, rujuta diwekar, body facts, busting food fads, alia bhatt health, alia bhatt food, alia bhatt body, alia bhatt fitness, alia bhatt dieting, indian express, indian express news Alia Bhatt busts food fads with Rujuta Diwekar! (Source: Rujuta Diwekar/Facebook)

Alia Bhatt is known for her stellar performances but these days she is also a role model to a lot of fans, considering her dedication to health and fitness. Recently, the 24-year-old teamed up with celebrity dietician Rujuta Diwekar for a chatty Facebook live session where she revealed her body secrets.

Making a bold statement, Bhatt shed light on what to focus in life and said, “No boy is worth starving for!” The actress also confessed that it is the first principle of her rule book. Shattering the concept of following the food trends online, she said, “Everyone’s talking about gluten-free pizza, brown bread and red rice, about reducing their carb intake, and I’m eating white bread and butter at 4am. Rujuta showed me how local food eaten in moderation can be healthy.”

Talking about her similarity with Kareena Kapoor Khan, Bhatt also said that she “never skips her rejuvenating glass of sugarcane juice post-workout”.

Sugar shouldn’t be ignored as it “helps cool down the body temperature after working out”.

“Ever since Kareena got to know that I share the same dietician, she has been joking with me and singing ‘Rujju, Rujju’ at parties, and now, I do the same with her. We’re going around spreading dietary joy,” Bhatt added.

Revealing her favourite dish, Bhatt gleefully said, “Dal khichdi and curd rice are my favourites with a spoonful of ghee.”

Talking about what Bhatt’s daily schedule is, Diwekar said that “it keeps changing,” and added, ” She will have rigorous dance sessions, action shoots and emotionally taxing days. She needs to look fabulous through it all.”

Watch the video here.

The video has garnered more than 762,000 views and 11,000 shares!

For all the latest Lifestyle News, download Indian Express App

© IE Online Media Services Pvt Ltd



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Jennifer Hudson goes for careful diet


Celebrity News

By  | 


Jennifer Hudson goes for careful diet. Jennifer Hudson has said she doesn’t have time to exercise, and so maintains her figure by being “very careful” about the food she eats. The 35-year-old singer has revealed her fabulous figure has almost nothing to do with exercise as she says she doesn’t have time to work out, and instead just makes sure she eats well in order to keep herself healthy. Speaking on UK television show ‘Lorraine‘ last Wednesday (29.03.17), the ‘Spotlight’ singer said: “I don’t have time to do much exercise, I just watch what I eat. I’m very careful and conscious of what I eat. I’ll be out and think, ‘no it’s too early to eat right now.’ I’m very conscious of what I put in my body.” It’s not the first time ‘The Voice UK’ judge – who dropped over 80 pounds by following a Weight Watchers eating plan – has spoken about her body either, as she previously said she considers her body transformation to be a bigger personal triumph than winning her Academy Award

for Best Supporting Actress for her depiction of Effie White in the film ‘Dreamgirls’ because she completely changed the way she thought about her figure. She said previously: “It’s because it’s such a personal thing. How often do you come up with a goal like that and achieve it? I looked at myself as if I was art and I said, ‘OK, I’m going to sculpt myself the way that I want.’ “Jennifer insists the key to her keeping the pounds off is that she has completely re-educated herself about food. She added: “It wasn’t that I had an eating problem, I just didn’t know to eat. Before I had my weight loss there was certain things I would avoid eating but now I eat whatever I want, I just know how to eat it – in moderation. That’s the key and knowing what you’re putting in your body.”

KEYWORDS: Jennifer Hudson goes for careful diet

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Diet trends through the ages and why fads don’t work


A cafe in Whangerei serves 'paleo coffee' in 2014: a long black mixed with a dollop of butter and a teaspoon of coconut oil.

FILE

A cafe in Whangerei serves ‘paleo coffee’ in 2014: a long black mixed with a dollop of butter and a teaspoon of coconut oil.

“Want to lose weight fast?”

“YES” we all say in our heads, as we’re paying attention to the carefully crafted social media post, or TV commercial.

Next come the convincing before and after shots, the guarantee on how “it’s so easy”, a smiling celebrity, and we’re climbing on the bandwagon.

The approach is so simple it’s almost embarrassing, and yet it’s worked on Kiwis for decades. 

A far back as the 1930s, the Evening Post newspaper spouted ‘recommendations’ from the US on slimming: two weeks of bananas and skimmed milk, followed by two weeks of whatever you like. 

The lemon detox diet soared in popularity after it was revealed Beyonce used it for rapid weight loss for her role in ...

123RF

The lemon detox diet soared in popularity after it was revealed Beyonce used it for rapid weight loss for her role in the 2006 film, Dreamgirls.

Around that time, we also hailed smoking as a way to combat weight gain, ignoring mounting evidence about its health effects until the 1950s. 

Looking back, it all seems so obvious. Smoking is bad for our health. Sugary drinks aren’t good for us. 

But fast forward to 2017 and we still market sugar to children, we still get sucked in by celebrity weight loss stories, and we’re still buying diet soda.

Perhaps the most influential diet of them all was one that peaked in the last decade, with a little help from Instagram filters and hipsters: paleo.

Arguably, paleo isn’t restrictive enough to be labelled a fad, but the diet undoubtedly became trendy, peaking in popularity about 2013.

It coasted off the movement towards clean eating, encouraging people to switch out grains and dairy for protein. 

Shortly before paleo arrived, the lemon detox diet promoted rapid weight loss through consuming nothing but lemon water, with cayenne pepper and a sugary syrup for 10 days. 

Although widely condemned by health professionals, the lemon detox diet is still marketed to anyone “looking for maximum weight loss in a short period of time,” according to a New Zealand website which sells lemon detox kits.

Written online testimonials, including one from a 15-year-old, boast fast results, feelings of exuberance and glowing skin.

However, one nutritionist and UK registered dietitian, Siobhan Miller, says “fad diets just don’t work”.

“Fad diets might help you lose weight, until you get fed-up, start over-eating and choose less healthy foods and pile the pounds back on.”

Miller emphasised the damaging long-term effects that quick-fix, drastic diets can do to our bodies.

“Rapid weight loss is not sustainable and yo-yo dieting – where weight is lost and then regained over the years – leads to being heavier than when you first started. 

“A very restrictive diet of any kind is most likely to be lacking in essential nutrients.”

The tried-and-true celebrity endorsement should be taken with a grain of salt, she said.

“Remember that celebrities are not experts in nutrition and have limited knowledge of nutrition so don’t be sucked in by fantastic claims.”

Excess weight creeped up over many years, so we had to give our bodies time to adjust to weight loss, she said.

“It’s not a surprise that when someone feels the urge to tackle weight they look for a quick fix. [But] there is no magic bullet and weight is not going to be lost quickly.”

All this noise just added to the confusion about what and how we were supposed to eat, Tauranga dietitian Fiona Boyle said.

“You have got to think of what you could sustain. Could you see yourself doing it in six months, or six years?

“Look at the whole picture.”

HOW DO YOU SPOT A FAD DIET?

The Association of UK Dietitians defines a fad diet as: the kind of plan where you eat a very restrictive diet with few foods or an unusual combination of foods for a short period of time and often lose weight very quickly. 


 – Stuff



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Diet trends through the ages and why fads don’t work


A cafe in Whangerei serves 'paleo coffee' in 2014: a long black mixed with a dollop of butter and a teaspoon of coconut oil.

FILE

A cafe in Whangerei serves ‘paleo coffee’ in 2014: a long black mixed with a dollop of butter and a teaspoon of coconut oil.

“Want to lose weight fast?”

“YES” we all say in our heads, as we’re paying attention to the carefully crafted social media post, or TV commercial.

Next come the convincing before and after shots, the guarantee on how “it’s so easy”, a smiling celebrity, and we’re climbing on the bandwagon.

The approach is so simple it’s almost embarrassing, and yet it’s worked on Kiwis for decades. 

A far back as the 1930s, the Evening Post newspaper spouted ‘recommendations’ from the US on slimming: two weeks of bananas and skimmed milk, followed by two weeks of whatever you like. 

The lemon detox diet soared in popularity after it was revealed Beyonce used it for rapid weight loss for her role in ...

123RF

The lemon detox diet soared in popularity after it was revealed Beyonce used it for rapid weight loss for her role in the 2006 film, Dreamgirls.

Around that time, we also hailed smoking as a way to combat weight gain, ignoring mounting evidence about its health effects until the 1950s. 

Looking back, it all seems so obvious. Smoking is bad for our health. Sugary drinks aren’t good for us. 

But fast forward to 2017 and we still market sugar to children, we still get sucked in by celebrity weight loss stories, and we’re still buying diet soda.

Perhaps the most influential diet of them all was one that peaked in the last decade, with a little help from Instagram filters and hipsters: paleo.

Arguably, paleo isn’t restrictive enough to be labelled a fad, but the diet undoubtedly became trendy, peaking in popularity about 2013.

It coasted off the movement towards clean eating, encouraging people to switch out grains and dairy for protein. 

Shortly before paleo arrived, the lemon detox diet promoted rapid weight loss through consuming nothing but lemon water, with cayenne pepper and a sugary syrup for 10 days. 

Although widely condemned by health professionals, the lemon detox diet is still marketed to anyone “looking for maximum weight loss in a short period of time,” according to a New Zealand website which sells lemon detox kits.

Written online testimonials, including one from a 15-year-old, boast fast results, feelings of exuberance and glowing skin.

However, one nutritionist and UK registered dietitian, Siobhan Miller, says “fad diets just don’t work”.

“Fad diets might help you lose weight, until you get fed-up, start over-eating and choose less healthy foods and pile the pounds back on.”

Miller emphasised the damaging long-term effects that quick-fix, drastic diets can do to our bodies.

“Rapid weight loss is not sustainable and yo-yo dieting – where weight is lost and then regained over the years – leads to being heavier than when you first started. 

“A very restrictive diet of any kind is most likely to be lacking in essential nutrients.”

The tried-and-true celebrity endorsement should be taken with a grain of salt, she said.

“Remember that celebrities are not experts in nutrition and have limited knowledge of nutrition so don’t be sucked in by fantastic claims.”

Excess weight creeped up over many years, so we had to give our bodies time to adjust to weight loss, she said.

“It’s not a surprise that when someone feels the urge to tackle weight they look for a quick fix. [But] there is no magic bullet and weight is not going to be lost quickly.”

All this noise just added to the confusion about what and how we were supposed to eat, Tauranga dietitian Fiona Boyle said.

“You have got to think of what you could sustain. Could you see yourself doing it in six months, or six years?

“Look at the whole picture.”

HOW DO YOU SPOT A FAD DIET?

The Association of UK Dietitians defines a fad diet as: the kind of plan where you eat a very restrictive diet with few foods or an unusual combination of foods for a short period of time and often lose weight very quickly. 


 – Stuff



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