Tag Archives: Media

Gwen Flamberg named VP Beauty & Style for AMI Celebrity Group, and Executive Editor, Beauty & Style for Us Weekly – Talking New MediaTalking New Media


Prior to her new role at AMI, Flamberg held roles at Ladies’ Home Journal, Woman’s Day, and Fitness, before joining Us Weekly in 2008

NEW YORK, NY — September 20, 2017 — American Media, Inc. (AMI) today announced the promotion of Gwen Flamberg to Vice President Beauty & Style for the AMI Celebrity Group as well as Executive Editor, Beauty & Style for Us Weekly. Flamberg previously served as Beauty Director of Us Weekly, she will report to AMI Chairman and CEO David J. Pecker.

“Gwen not only represents the amazing depth of talent that was key to our acquisition of Us Weekly but also the passion and commitment that underscores how this brand will continue to grow and flourish in the coming months,” said Mr. Pecker. “Her comprehensive industry knowledge and her insights and impact on beauty and style trends is an extraordinary asset that can continue to be leveraged to the benefit of our brands’ passionate audiences in this new role.”

Flamberg will oversee the beauty and style coverage for AMI’s celebrity titles including Us Weekly, Star, and OK! across all platforms.

“I’m thrilled to step up to a role that allows me to create the most engaging content for readers who share my voracious appetite for celebrity trends,” said Flamberg.  “I couldn’t be more excited to tap into each brand’s unique DNA, delivering stories where readers live 24/7, continuing to enhance AMI’s standing as the go-to source for all things celebrity beauty and style.”

In addition to directing the beauty and style coverage of Us Weekly across all platforms as the brand’s Beauty Director, Flamberg has established herself as one of the most sought after industry insiders offering commentary on The Today Show, E! News, Extra, Bloomberg News, CNN Showbiz Tonight, Good Morning America, The Insider, Access Hollywood among other national outlets.

Prior to her new role at AMI, Flamberg developed her standing as one of the beauty and style industry’s leading influencers through roles at Ladies’ Home Journal, Woman’s Day, and Fitness before joining Us Weekly in 2008.



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American Media, Inc. Names Gwen Flamberg Vice President Beauty And Style Of The AMI Style Group


NEW YORK, Sept. 20, 2017 /PRNewswire/ — American Media, Inc. (AMI) today announced the promotion of Gwen Flamberg to Vice President Beauty & Style for the AMI Celebrity Group as well as Executive Editor, Beauty & Style for Us Weekly. Flamberg previously served as Beauty Director of Us Weekly, she will report to AMI Chairman and CEO David J. Pecker.

“Gwen not only represents the amazing depth of talent that was key to our acquisition of Us Weekly but also the passion and commitment that underscores how this brand will continue to grow and flourish in the coming months,” said Mr. Pecker. “Her comprehensive industry knowledge and her insights and impact on beauty and style trends is an extraordinary asset that can continue to be leveraged to the benefit of our brands’ passionate audiences in this new role.”

Flamberg will oversee the beauty and style coverage for AMI’s celebrity titles including Us Weekly, Star, and OK! across all platforms.

“I’m thrilled to step up to a role that allows me to create the most engaging content for readers who share my voracious appetite for celebrity trends,” said Flamberg.  “I couldn’t be more excited to tap into each brand’s unique DNA, delivering stories where readers live 24/7, continuing to enhance AMI’s standing as the go-to source for all things celebrity beauty and style.”

In addition to directing the beauty and style coverage of Us Weekly across all platforms as the brand’s Beauty Director, Flamberg has established herself as one of the most sought after industry insiders offering commentary on The Today Show, E! News, Extra, Bloomberg News, CNN Showbiz Tonight, Good Morning America, The Insider, Access Hollywood among other national outlets.

Prior to her new role at AMI, Flamberg developed her standing as one of the beauty and style industry’s leading influencers through roles at Ladies’ Home Journal, Woman’s Day, and Fitness before joining Us Weekly in 2008.

About American Media, Inc.
American Media, Inc. (AMI) owns and operates the leading print and digital celebrity and active lifestyle media brands in the United States.  AMI’s titles include Us Weekly, OK!, Star, Men’s Journal, Men’s Fitness, Muscle & Fitness, Flex, Mr. Olympia Contest, National Enquirer and other celebrity titles.  AMI also manages 12 different digital sites including Usmagazine.com, OKmagazine.com, RadarOnline.com, MensJournal.com, MensFitness.com, MuscleandFitness.com and other digital and social properties.  AMI’s magazines have a combined total circulation of 5.6+ million and reach more than 51 million men and women each month.  AMI’s digital properties reach approximately 65 million unique visitors monthly.

View original content:http://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/american-media-inc-names-gwen-flamberg-vice-president-beauty-and-style-of-the-ami-style-group-300523106.html

SOURCE American Media, Inc.



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Media veterans Anirban Das Blah, Jiggy George join hands to set up Mojostar



Mumbai, Aug 24:  

Celebrity management firm Kwan Entertainment and brand management and licensing agency Dream Theatre have come together to create Mojostar, a celebrity-driven house of brands.

Anirban Das Blah and Jiggy George own Kwan and Dream Theatre respectively.

The company will focus on partnering with celebrities to co-create authentic brands in the areas of fashion, fitness, personal care, and more.

Kwan Entertainment has established itself as India’s largest entertainment marketplace connecting investors, artists, and brands. Dream Theatre, on the other hand, is India’s premier brand management and licensing company that builds, represents, distributes, and retails iconic brands in the entertainment, sports, and fashion space.

Mojostar’s operations will be boosted by the combined reach, knowledge, and domain expertise of the two companies.

It is a first-of-its-kind partnership that will look to tap into the growing influence of Indian celebrities to create powerful retail brands in the country.

Mojostar has already finalised Bollywood stars Jacqueline Fernandez and Tiger Shroff to launch the first line of celebrity brand products catering to the fashion, fitness, and personal care segments.

Anirban Blah, Director – Kwan Entertainment and Founding Partner – Mojostar, said, “Celebrities hold massive influence in trends related to fashion, fitness, personal care, and appearance, and have been used by brands for decades for endorsements. This represents a large and profitable market opportunity to create authentic brands with celebrities. We have partnered with Dream Theatre to launch Mojostar and create world-class retail brands in India. Globally, we have seen billions of dollars of value being created by celebrity brands such as David Beckham, Victoria Beckham, Mary-Kate and Ashley Olsen, and Jay-Z.”

Jiggy George, Founder & CEO – Dream Theatre and Founding Partner – Mojostar, added, “In India, there is an obvious market opportunity for celebrity brands, but the authentic approach to celebrity brand creation has not yet matured. Anirban and I have been working together for a while now to address this market and come up with attractive brand propositions. This joint venture will be leveraging our mutual strengths to revolutionise the way retail brands are created in India.”

(This article was published on August 25, 2017)

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Social Media Trends: The Livestream Economy


Social media interaction between friends, businesses, cultures, and people in general, is constantly changing. Just a few years ago, the livestreaming concept became a reality, and now people can take video in real time and share it instantly with social media followers. Though the initial livestreaming concepts centered on getting regular people to livestream life events and share them with friends and family, the idea is rapidly evolving as businesses, celebrities, and yes, normal people, realize these are new ways to go viral.

Facebook Makes It Easy to Go Live

When Facebook began offering its livestreaming to all users, the social media giant could have chosen to force users to download a separate app for Facebook Live. After all, Facebook has done that with Messenger, making accessing messages either excellent or inconvenient, depending on your take and how often you use Messenger. Instead, Facebook integrated Live into the regular Facebook app experience. The idea? That anyone, even someone who has never livestreamed before, can go Live in an instant.

Anyone can take out their phones and livestream an event to Facebook, where people can easily tune in. Because Facebook will show you live videos at the top of your feed, you’ll see someone going live before you see other posts that people have made. These videos hang around after you’ve streamed them, giving people the chance to watch them after the streaming is done. Old livestreamed videos from Facebook can go viral where others, which disappear, cannot.

Is Livestreaming Appealing to Regular People?

Right now, Facebook Live isn’t living up to one of its goals, which is to get regular people to livestream their lives for friends and family. Instead, it’s mostly a social justice and celebrity thing that regular people tune into. However, businesses, bloggers, and regular individuals could choose to leverage livestreaming to get the attention of Facebook audiences. Since few businesses are utilizing Live in any meaningful way right now, it could have a serious advertising impact if businesses develop marketing strategies around Live.

Periscope Is Almost Its Own Social Network

Twitter’s livestreaming app, Periscope, works separately from the Twitter app. With Periscope, you livestream similarly to the way you do on Facebook. Unlike on Facebook, you have to be a Periscope user, not just a Twitter user, to choose to broadcast. That gives Twitter users one more step, downloading an app before they become live broadcasters. People who aren’t sure they want to ever try it are probably more likely to try it on Facebook because the capability is already there.

However, because Periscope so easily publishes on Twitter, you can also rope in lots of people who are just using Twitter. You may not be able to broadcast video without Periscope, but you are not limited to a Periscope audience. Your Twitter audience is right there, too.

Periscope will save a video for 24 hours. Facebook Live saves them indefinitely, which means that some of the most popular videos from Facebook Live are viewed long after the live broadcast ended. The 24-hour period on Periscope means people can use other apps and recording devices to save the videos forever, but you won’t continue to collect views via Periscope.

Other Apps Compete From Alternate Platforms

The other two big contenders are Instagram and Snapchat, and these image- and video-based platforms seem ready-made to slide into livestreaming. Instagram has actually been cannibalizing Snapchat’s audience in many ways: It now offers stories, which people can watch, edit, and filter.

Though Snapchat has been offering people an easy way to take a short video clip and post it moments later, the app still doesn’t have livestreaming. That’s where Instagram has Snapchat beat. Instagram recently offered livestreaming, which you can do and then save to your story for a 24-hour period. Because the feature is so new, it’s hard to tell how successful it’s been so far. But Instagram stories have been more popular than Snapchat stories for a while, now; the two are very similar, and because Instagram also continues to offer feeds of permanent photos, it feels more like a traditional social media app with exciting new features.

Interactive Broadcasting Is the Next Big Thing

What can we learn from this? Live broadcasting is growing in popularity, especially when people have social media platform options from which to do it. But live broadcasting has a major flaw: It has a low interactive element. Yes, on Facebook people can react to and respond to your livestream, but they do that via text and the little emoticons Facebook offers as reactions

That’s where interactive broadcasting products like Agora come in. One-way live broadcasting becomes two-way streaming. Agora integrates with existing apps, giving businesses the chance to add interactive broadcasting to existing marketing. Basically, you can have up to seven people streaming in a feed at a time, and an audience of 10,000 people. Those people can text comments and even get looped in by the livestreaming people. They can also chat with each other.

Livestreaming With No Separate App

Agora opens up a platform for brands, celebrities, and bloggers to speak directly to, and chat with, audiences. Consumers can also interact with each other in this model, bringing everyone to a level of connectivity other live-broadcasting platforms don’t offer. Because customers don’t have to download a separate app, Agora has far-reaching implications for how businesses will deliver content in the future. Your audience will be watching your stream via your app, which means no distractions from other brands.

A livestream has many cultural, social, and business implications, and only a few of those are currently making waves. As customer service and customer interaction become a bigger focus with businesses, livestreaming offers intriguing customer experience options that previously did not exist. It also becomes a way for brands to refocus on new products, or to bring attention to social issues that the brand supports. It will be interesting to see how marketing and livestreaming come together in the next few years.

Image source: Pexels

This post is part of our contributor series. The views expressed are the author’s own and not necessarily shared by TNW.

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How Sprint leveraged Gen Z to pivot their brand



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Social media vs socialite media


With the recent news of the Federal Trade Commission (FTC) in the United States cracking down on celebrities who promote unlabeled sponsored content, the rise for regulation in the social media advertising market is becoming more prevalent.

Holding talent accountable for what they post will make it tougher for brands to control content and potentially further complicate the influencer posting market.

Here are some altered cliché metaphors to help handle your social media/ advertising spend with talent acquisition:

Make sure it’s true love

Influencers now risk potentially being fined/ sued in some countries where, if they knowingly promote a product that does not work and their testimonials are not genuine or truthful, the ad will not protect them.

For brands, this means a greater need for synergy between the talent and their product. In choosing to endorse a product, influencers must believe in the brand or have a genuine connection to the product. Make sure it’s true love before the grand union.

Put your money where the mouth is

Using platforms to understand brand engagement can help calculate ROI and more accurately depict a pricing chart for influencers. Using followers as a metric for purchase is no longer the only measure, as platforms now allow brands to measure how many people are engaging with posts and their content. Effectiveness of posted content can now be measured and influencers can be paid per engagement rather than for their overall following. Put your dollar bills on where the chatter is.

Count your chickens

Influencer marketing in its founding stages was measured in value of mass following, dominated by socialites who were popular on social platforms because of their social/celebrity status.

Now, as the market becomes more educated, with the use of social media analytics, brands can measure the effectiveness of posting through socialites vs. social media users.

Micro influencers often have a high engagement when it comes to product reviews and recommendations, while celebrities have a higher reach and fan based engagement.

Using celebrities to develop a cult following around a brand is quite measurable. One can even gauge the level of negative or positive conversation around a campaign using the right analytics.

Using the data, create a social media strategy to utilise both celebrities and influencers in a way that they complement one another. This will allow key messaging to reach the masses, while still having an element of quality content to back it up. Do the math till it adds up.

Hire your standards

Knowing the profile of celebrities and influencers is detrimental to a brand’s strategy. While analytics are a strong indicator, the importance of understanding the personality, willingness and nature of talent in deciding on whether to permanently associate them with your brand is key.

Hire talent according to the standard of your brand’s integrity and always be transparent with your followers. Remember that consumers are equally educated on the realms of social media. Ensure talent creates content that connects and appeals to your customer rather than content that manipulates them.

The evolving doors of social media market trends are continually turning. So, steer away from common unexplained market trends, take strategic turns driven by the math and prioritise your brand’s identity to get back into the driver’s seat.

(By Jessica Cox, Spread Communications)



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Hello! Goodbye: royals gift to magazines as reality stars lose shine, says editor | Media


Love Island may have been the surprise television hit of the summer, but interest in reality TV stars in Britain is showing signs of waning while intrigue surrounding the royal family reaches record levels.

The latest circulation figures show sales of celebrity magazines are slumping, and the editor of one of the market leaders has questioned the longevity of reality TV personalities.

While the stars of this year’s Love Island may soon disappear from viewers’ minds, Rosie Nixon, the editor-in-chief of Hello!, said interest in the royals had reached an unprecedented level thanks to the Duke and Duchess of Cambridge and Prince Harry.

Nixon said the new generation of royals had “changed the image of our monarchy” among the British public and around the world.

ABC magazine circulation figures show dramatic declines for both celebrity and women’s weekly titles. The circulation of Heat fell 17% in the first six months of 2017 compared with the same period last year, while rivals Look, Closer and Grazia were down 35%, 20% and 13% respectively.

The celebrity titles are battling against social media and online rivals such as MailOnline, but the slump in sales also suggests the appeal of reading about celebrities has declined since an explosion in interest around the turn of the century that sparked huge audiences for shows such as Big Brother and I’m A Celebrity … Get Me Out of Here!

The circulation of Hello! was down 9% year on year between January and June, but up more than 2% compared to the previous six months.

Nixon said the magazine industry was “really tough” but the royal family was the “gift that keeps on giving”, while Pippa Middleton’s wedding in May had bolstered her title’s sales by 100,000 in one week.

“They appeal across age groups,” Nixon said. “I think the average reader age for Hello! is late 30s, but then we say we are read from everyone from 18 to 80. There is a big age span there and the royals transcend that age group, I think.

“I think the Duchess of Cambridge really has had a phenomenal effect. She was the normal middle-class girl who bagged a prince and it was such a fascinating story. She has made the royal family feel more accessible.

“Prince Harry made a very interesting comment recently when he said he couldn’t imagine now that a young boy at the age he was when he lost his mother would walk behind her coffin at her funeral in the glare of the world media. That wouldn’t happen any more and the fact he has even spoken about that shows a very different image of the monarchy than we had. That buttoned-up and not talking about your emotions that we previously had has been completely blown apart.”

Nixon, who has been at the helm of Hello! for almost a decade, said interest in the royals was the highest it had ever been, helped also by Prince George and Princess Charlotte.

“I think they could be our Brexit secret weapon,” she added. “Their [the Duke and Duchess of Cambridge’s] trip to Poland and Germany probably did more for us than Theresa May will ever be able to do. They really have changed that image of our monarchy.”

Asked why Hello! had outperformed other celebrity titles and enjoyed a prolonged period of success in Britain over 30 years, Nixon said: “I think we have always stuck to giving a platform to true stars, people that really are celebrated because they excel in an area of their life – whether that is acting or singing or sport, genuine talent.

“I think those kind of stars have longevity and those stars are always going to burn brightest for the longest time. I think other titles have played more to trends or people who are popular at the moment. The reality show stars that were very popular 10 years ago – the public doesn’t really want to read about those in their magazine any more because I think we can keep up with them online or on social media. It’s a different calibre of celebrity.”

Nixon said social media had changed how the public interacted with celebrities, but some stars now wanted to pull back from using Twitter.

“I think they give so much away themselves, although we are now seeing a change in the popularity of Twitter,” she said. “People are realising that you can actually say too much, and do you want to comment on everything?”

Hello! launched in the UK with an interview with Princess Anne conducted in Buckingham Palace. Nixon would like to be able to mark its 30th anniversary next year with an announcement that Prince Harry and the actor Meghan Markle are engaged.

“That would be nice if you could arrange that,” she said. “I think we are hoping that a wedding may be on the cards there. That would be great news for Hello! Obviously I can’t actually dictate when Harry might pop the question, but we are hoping that he might. They have been together for a year now just about, so that seems like a good enough time for me.”

Despite the pressure on the industry, Nixon backed Hello! to survive. “That make-up of big royal exclusives combined with these amazing wedding photo albums that Hello! is known for has kind of not changed really. I think even though obviously the personalities that we feature – the movers and shakers of the day – are now different, the way that we compile the magazine is actually comfortingly the same to our readers.

“I think in a time when the headlines are dominated by bad news, the escapism that Hello! provides is still one of its key strengths.”



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The Media Treat Chelsea Clinton Like a Politician or Celebrity


gettyimages 621640252 1 Why Does the Media Treat Chelsea Clinton Like Shes Been Elected to Something?

Chelsea Clinton. NICHOLAS KAMM/AFP/Getty Images)

Celebrities and other notable figures gain attention for their political remarks. But Chelsea Clinton, who has never held political office or done anything to earn her fame, has been elevated as a spokesperson against President Donald Trump solely based on her Twitter account.

BuzzFeed recently devoted an entire article to Chelsea’s tweeting about how to make spinach pancakes. “Due to the ‘pureed spinach’ in the mixture, the pancakes were a glowing shade of green, and bore no similarities to the classic buttery, beige breakfast staple,” BuzzFeed reported. However, BuzzFeed wasn’t the only media outlet that covered the tweet; the Washington Post, Boston Globe, Atlanta Journal Constitution, Fox News, the Daily Dot, People Magazine, Huffington Post, Mic, ABC News, and other outlets all covered the tweet. Even MSNBC’s Chris Hayes couldn’t help himself from investigating further, asking Clinton on Twitter, “My question about the spinach pancakes is: do they taste more like spinach or more like pancakes?”

Clinton partisans throughout the mainstream media are giving Chelsea Clinton’s Twitter account an absurd amount of coverage—absent of any criticism. This obsession with Chelsea Clinton isn’t just reserved for monotonous tweets that warrant no analysis. Whenever a topic trends and Chelsea Clinton tweets about it, there’s a flurry of loyal reporters that sensationalize the tweet into a formidable opposing voice to wherever the outrage is directed.

The Hill has devoted entire articles to Chelsea Clinton’s tweet about Rep. Steve King’s recent racist tweet, her tweet about the GOP’s Obamacare replacement, her tweet about Ben Carson referring to slaves as immigrants, her tweet defending Kellyanne Conway from sexist remarks in regards to a White House photo, her tweets from a Muslim solidarity rally in New York City, her tweet criticizing Trump’s comments about Sweden, her tweet about anti-Semitism, her tweet about a court ruling on Trump’s Muslim travel ban, her tweet praising New York City Subway riders for erasing Swastikas, her tweets back and forth with Kellyanne Conway about Conway’s Bowling Green massacre gaffe, her tweet from a New York City protest on Trump’s Muslim travel ban, and her tweet defending Barron Trump. Sen. Bernie Sanders recently wrote an op-ed about the Zika Virus for the New York Times, and The Hill framed its report on the article around Chelsea Clinton’s tweet about how she liked the article. On March 15, The Hill published another article fueling speculation that Chelsea Clinton was going to run for office—based on assumptions made from her tweets. In all, The Hill has published roughly two articles per week since Trump took office about Chelsea Clinton’s tweet.

Chelsea Clinton’s Twitter account has received praise and admiration from mainstream media outlets that have effectively written full page advertisements for Chelsea Clinton. Politico reported, “Chelsea Clinton has discovered something new since Inauguration Day: a spicy, sarcastic online personality.” The Washington Post claimed Chelsea Clinton’s Twitter account “has lately been getting saltier,” a few weeks after they dubbed her political voice on Twitter as “edgy.”

This celebrity coverage of Chelsea Clinton’s Twitter account is the type of reporting that has repelled millions of Americans from the mainstream media. Its desperation to court, praise, and serve as publicists for the wealthy and powerful is palpable. Chelsea Clinton hasn’t accomplished anything that warrants the amount of media coverage she’s getting. Immediately after Hillary Clinton’s election loss, rumors began circulating in the media that Chelsea Clinton was going to be groomed for a congressional race. It appears that the mainstream media, regardless of the veracity of those rumors, is willingly to freely offer their services to provide that grooming.



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How Social Media & Fast Fashion Are Hurting Trends


instagram fashion brands

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E-commerce plays, a new emphasis on experiential spending and the decline of brick-and-mortar aren’t the only things fashion firms have to contend with these days. According to experts, the rise of fast fashion and an increasingly social-media-obsessed culture are creating new hurdles for footwear and apparel brands and retailers.

We live in a culture where people will see something on Instagram or on a celebrity and they want that immediately,” Elizabeth Cline, author of “Overdressed: The Shockingly High Cost of Cheap Fashion,” said during a panel discussion this week at the American Apparel & Footwear Association Executive Summit in Washington, D.C. “I see how ferociously the pace of trends move now and that has definitely been driven by the internet.”

The intense pace at which trends — perhaps “fad” is a more accurate word —emerge and then fade may be giving way to a new threat to the fashion industry: a lack of trends altogether.

Generation Z consumers — most of whom are age 20 and younger — devour popular clothing and shoe styles just as quickly as they surface. While previous generations may have used quality clothing and high-end labels as a status symbol, social status for younger consumers is more so linked to owning an abundance of the moment’s “it” items.

Further, many young consumers post their every move to social media on a daily — if not, hourly — basis. And a desire to avoid breaking the cardinal rule of not being seen in the same outfit twice means this group is ditching many of their clothes and shoes within seconds of hitting the “send” button on Instagram.

The result, according to Cline, is a fashion industry pressured to create massive volumes of disposable merchandise — an environmental nightmare— while craftsmanship and quality also fall by the wayside.

What’s more, many independent designers and brands with a focus on craftsmanship are struggling to find ways to sell their creative and sustainable wares.

But according to Cline, a saving grace for such brands and retailers could be the simultaneous rise in consumer demand for accountability from corporations.

We’re seeing a backlash against fast fashion from consumers in the millennial generation,” Cline said. “They’ve come around to this place of saying, ‘My closet is full of stuff, but I’m looking for a more positive story behind my [clothing and shoes], whether its social consciousness or sustainability … I see great marketing potential [with this group].”



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